Our Favorite 40 Museums – Part 1

As we celebrate our fortieth year in business we’d like to share with you some of the wonderful American art museums which have helped inform our understanding of American and European art. Sometimes built from personal collections, other times put together to fulfill a community need, these forty museums have allowed the public to engage with all types of art. In this four part series we would like to share with you some of our favorite US museums, with the understanding that this is just the beginning.

*Note this list of museums are not in any particular order.

1. Everson Museum of Art Located in Syracuse New York, our backyard, the Everson Museum was designed by the well-known architect I. M. Pei. Their main focus is on ceramics. and they also have a select collection of paintings, including works by Sanford Gifford, Gilbert Stuart, Edward Hicks, and Eastman Johnson.

Oliver Ingraham Lay "Two Friends"

Oliver Ingraham Lay “Two Friends” from the Everson Museum.

2. Historic Deerfield A classic 18-century New England village, wonderfully restored with period furnishings, textiles, artwork, and crafts. Historic Deerfield focuses on the culture and history of Deerfield, Massachusetts a town which was settled in 1669. The architecture and contents of the twelve original houses that line Main Street have been carefully preserved and may be viewed by guided or self-guided tours.

3. Frick Collection Both a museum and research center, the Frick Collection was initially assembled by industrialist Henry Clay Frick and is located in his former home on Fifth Avenue in New York City. Featuring works by Whistler, Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Gainsborough the museum is a small gem located along Manhattan’s Museum Mile. 

4. Smith College Museum of Art In our opinion one of the most impressive collections of a college of this size. The collection at the Smith College Museum of Art in Northampton, Massachusetts was put together to facilitate the study and appreciation of visual arts. Established in 1879 to support the college curriculum, the museum has focused on American and European art. In the ensuing years the collection has grown to include African, Islamic and Asian art. Featured artists include Wheeler, Bellows, Copley, Bierstadt, Degas, Monet, and Cézanne.  Continue reading

Happy Birthday Ogden Pleissner

It’s no secret the principals of The Caldwell Gallery love to fly-fish. Our catch and release fishing echoes the “catch and release” nature of selling art. A purchase can be thought of as a catch, and the subsequent sale is the release. In between, we like to think of ourselves as custodians instead of owners. We first encountered Ogden Pleissner (1905-1983) through his sporting art, specifically his fly-fishing paintings. As an avid sportsman himself, Pleissner’s intimate knowledge and experience as a fisherman and hunter brought an authenticity to his art which other sportsmen appreciated during his lifetime…and in the thirty years since his passing.

Ogden Pleissner at work in an undated photo.

The sportsman at work in an undated photo.

Continue reading

Hidden Treasure Meets Bucket List

"The Arkell Museum"

The House That Beech Nut Built. Thank you, Mr. Arkell…

All of us should have a bucket list, right? Hidden treasures should comprise at least 33.33% of that list, according to my scientific research findings. For today’s hidden treasure suggestion, I present to you The Arkell Museum in Canajoharie, NY. You know where that is, right? Nestled in a small town on the banks of the Mohawk River. Continue reading

Father’s Day Reflections – Storm King Art Center

A Father Reflected (and Reflecting) on Father's Day

A father reflected on Father’s Day…

     Special days call for special measures. And since on our entire planet there’s nothing quite like the Storm King Art Center in Mountainville, NY (Think Hudson Highlands & West Point area), what better place to find myself with family on Father’s Day. Reflecting on the meaning of being a father, and all that fatherhood entails, can’t really be done in a Barca Lounger with a TV remote in one’s hand. Well, for me at least. Continue reading