Our Favorite 40 Museums – Part 3

As we continue to celebrate our gallery’s fortieth year in business we encourage you to explore some of these exceptional museums located throughout the US.

*Note this list of museums is not in any particular order. To read about some of the other museums on our list click here for Part 1 and here for Part 2 and here for part 4 of this series.

21. Yale University Art Gallery

Established in 1832 to open up dialogue between students, faculty, and the wider public, the Yale University Art Gallery is both one of the oldest university art museums, and one of the biggest with a collection which has grown to more than 200,000 works of art. The breadth of artworks range from ancient Mediterranean to American decorative arts, paintings, and sculptures; and include the art of Islam, Asia, Europe, and Africa. The museum also has strong holdings of photography, modern, and contemporary art. Located on the Yale University campus in downtown New Haven, Connecticut this encyclopedic museum is worth a trip if you are traveling through southern New England. Separate, but not to be missed is the Yale Center for British Art, which was originally formed from a collection donated to the university by Paul Mellon ’29. Housed in a building designed by Louis I. Kahn, it is home to the largest collection of British art anywhere outside the United Kingdom.

henry Koerner, Tunnel of Love

“Tunnel of Love” by Henry Koerner at the Yale University of Art Gallery.

22. Amon Carter Museum of American Art

The cornerstone of this Texas museum’s collection lies in the Western American artworks of Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell which, along with the funds for constructing a building, were a bequest of Amon G. Carter. In the half century since the museum opened they have added significant works by American artists including Frederic Church, Winslow Homer, Daniel Chester French, Grant Wood, Stuart Davis, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Robert Laurent. The museum also houses an impressive research library containing over 50,000 volumes which compliment their collection of American art. Continue reading

Back to the Future – 2012 Reviewed, 2013 Launched…

Where to begin?

Presidential elections, fiscal cliffs, End of Days, Olympics, Sandy Hook. The world seems larger…yet feels smaller. Meaner…yet more hopeful. More logical…yet less clear.

As modern humans we’re supposed to interface, naturally and like good little soldiers, to the ever more complicated and invasive technology of information overload. It swirls and envelops us at every turn. We somehow need to make sure we keep our sanity and humanity intact. Where do I find a playbook? Do we lose our humanity by filtering out the world sitting behind our computers or staring at our smart phones? Should we utilize these devices to enhance what’s really real – our flesh and bone connections to ourselves, our friends, and our loved ones? It’s a complicated question to which is no simple answer, especially for those of us who uses a computer for much of each work day.

Robert Natkin's painting entitled Interior

Robert Natkin’s 1961 work Interior

The balance for us as a private art dealers, is that our product – art – is about humanity. Continue reading